Walking In Herefordshire

Walking in Herefordshire offers great walks and trails for you to try. From short strolls by pools to rambles through woodland there’s something for everyone.

14 Ideas For Walking In Herefordshire

Walking in Herefordshire woods is the easiest way to enjoy outdoor activities, get closer to nature and leave behind the hustle and bustle of modern everyday life. From wide, grassy tracks to unexplored pathways and leafy tunnels, woods are places where we can relax, unwind and have some fun outdoors.

Walking in Herefordshire is a great form of exercise, it helps to keep you fit and healthy and is a really easy way to start being more active. Woods are truly magical playgrounds where children can have exciting adventures.

With loads to explore and peaceful spots to enjoy these areas are perfect for family picnics too, see a few of our favourite perfect places to picnic in Herefordshire for an alfresco feast.

Finding walking & running events in Herefordshire as never been easier and there is something for everyone – from beginner to seasoned vet covering all distances from family fun walks and runs to marathons.

Credenhill Park Wood

Credenhill Park Woods was once the site of a busy Iron Age tribal capital, and has also been a Roman army depot and a medieval deer park.

Today, the wood is a peaceful place for a walk, with lots of walking trails to enjoy and terrific views to let all that history capture your imagination.

Berrington Hall

Enjoy a day exploring Berrington Hall in Leominster, the parkland and lakeside walk.

The National Trust for Herefordshire has some great walks and trails for you to try. From short strolls by pools to rambles through woodland.

Queenswood

Queenswood Country Park features an extensive and exciting range of attractions that are interesting, fun and healthy for people of all ages. There are different way-marked walks around the arboretum and wider woodland ranging from 1 mile to 2.5 miles and these include easy-access paths.

Their Gruffalo Trail, feature five larger-than-life Gruffalo characters, and is perfect for ages 2 to 6 years old but great fun for all the family! There is a woodland playground, ideal for children aged 2 to 10 years, and they run children’s holiday clubs and activity sessions during the school holidays, offering great things to do in half-term

Nupend Wood

Nupend Wood in Fownhope is the perfect wood and hangs either side of a limestone spine. Parts of the wood were once quarried, giving the ground a sometimes mesmerising, convulsed aspect.

Mostly lovely ancient woodland, principally of ash and oak. Whilst following the walking route your eyes will keep catching the giant yews on the ridge, left stranded from pagan time.

Haugh Wood

Haugh Woods are mainly made up of hard forest tracks, with gentle slopes, which make easy going for all including pushchairs.

Haugh Wood is a wonderful place to visit with the kids, especially on a sunny day when you can bring a picnic to enjoy as you look out for species such as the Wood White, Speckled White, and various types of butterflies.

The woodland is close to Broadmoor Common Nature Reserve, which is another good spot for butterflies, plus it has some unusual birds.

Brockhampton Estate

Brockhampton Estate in Bromyard offers a wildlife walk with ancient treesThere’s something for everyone.

The National Trust for Herefordshire has some great walks and trails for you to try. From short strolls by pools to rambles through woodland.

Croft Castle & Parkland

Try one of these invigorating walks around Croft Castle and Parkland: Fishpool Dingle Walk, Croft Ambrey Walk, Ancient Tree Walk & Pokehouse Wood Walk.

There’s something for everyone.

The National Trust for Herefordshire has some great walks and trails for you to try. From short strolls by pools to rambles through woodland.

Offa’s Dyke Path

Offa’s Dyke Path is surrounded by history and wildlife beside the 8th Century ancient monument along the English Welsh Border.

Mortimer Trail

Take to the Mortimer Trail, the idyllic 30 mile walkers route that winds from Ludlow, at the Shropshire border in the north, to Kington in the south.

Discover the places of medieval politics and scheming, of alliances made and alliances broken – and a bloody victory that lead to a new King of England.

Weir Garden

Be absorbed by the natural beauty at Weir Garden (National Trust), a spectacular riverside garden bordered by the River Wye. For centuries this site has been used as a pleasure ground for fishing, boating and swimming, with a priority to manage in a natural way to create a varied habitat for wildlife.

Visit the gardens and country homes in Herefordshire and enjoy exploring tranquil havens.

Circular Walks

There are 15 Circular Walks around the county and these are all clearly waymarked allowing you to take in the local history and heritage whilst exploring the hills and historic landmarks.

There are numerous free leaflets with all the information needed about all the routes and trails you will be taking.

Wye Valley Walk

The Wye Valley Walk runs for 136 miles from the slopes of Plynlimon in mid Wales (near the source of the River Wye) to Chepstow in Monmouthshire (where the Wye joins the Severn Estuary). The walk enters Herefordshire at Hay-on-Wye and leaves the county after 57 miles, just north of Monmouth.

The walk is clearly waymarked as it follows the route of the river, either along riverside paths or in sections giving excellent views of the Wye Valley from the surrounding hills.

Herefordshire Trail

The Herefordshire Trail is a circular trail, approximately 154 miles, created and set up by the Herefordshire Ramblers Association.

It links the five market towns of Ledbury, Ross-on-Wye, Kington, Leominster and Bromyard, along with some of the picturesque villages and hamlets for which Herefordshire is renowned.

Monnow Valley Walk

The Monnow Valley Walk is a river route from where the River Monnow and River Wye meet, to the source of the River Monnow near Charwel Ddu on the east side of Hay Bluff close to the Offa’s Dyke Path, with a four mile section to Hay-on-Wye on the Offa’s Dyke Path.